In Memoriam Howard Naud and Richard Thomas: The Royal Victoria Hospital Loves You!

This post is a tribute to my two colleagues and friends Howard Naud and Richard Thomas. These two young men who worked in the Receiving Dept of the Royal Victoria Hospital died recently at the Glen site within 2 weeks of each other. Neither got a chance to retire in the traditional sense of the the word. Howard was an honest and sensitive man; his kindness was felt by all who knew him. And, Richard Thomas was a real live wire! Always joking and telling funny stories; they echo in our ears still. These guys were full of life and they shared their energy with all of us. I was lucky to have worked with them and got a chance to take their portraits in the final days of the Royal Victoria Hospital. And during Howard’s last hours, I was there with him and his devoted and loving wife Yanny. Death, even when expected is always a surprise. As a photographer I witness life, death and everything in between. I have always felt it was my duty to record and share the world we live in. With that in mind, I want to introduce you all to these two incredible men of the Royal Victoria Hospital’s Receiving Department. And so I invite you all to step around back of the Royal Victoria Hospital. Enter through the back. The Receiving Door; walk down the corridor and see the faces we saw and knew. Howard and Richard, thank you for being there! You were a big part of us. We The Royal Victoria Hospital Love and Miss You Both. Rest Well my brothers. Love Michael

 

Aboriginal Day Montreal Children’s Hospital

  Well, on Thursday June 21st my usual lunch hour walk was arrested … It happened to be Aboriginal Day and there was an event in the PK Subban Atrium at the Montreal Children’s Hospital. I was working that day as the Pediatric Medical Photographer, and walking by for my lunch hour walk I was entranced by the speaker who was Nakuset, the Executive Director of the Native Woman’s Shelter of Montreal. Her words struck: the stories and experiences she shared concerning Aboriginal People in the health care system were very powerful. Nakuset is powerful and passionate speaker. What was to follow was healing music from the Buffalo Hat Singers (if I’m not mistaken)  performed with such passion and compassion that it really struck a emotional chord with me; it was their voices that penetrated and resounded deep. The healing properties and the rhythm of the healing drum echoed our own healing hearts. The healing ritual which they performed invited people to take a pinch of Tabaco and drop it on the surface of the drum as they performed the healing ritual. I felt it was such a necessary ritual to take place within our healing environment. I was so glad I stayed  and record this magical event. As I listened my own emotions came through my eye’s. At times it was hard for me to hold my camera. I cried and continued to capture this wonderful and powerful ceremony. By the way a very special Clown came to visit, and that of course was Dr. FiFi and her friend! No healing ceremony would be complete with out these Good Healing Vibes!